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2011 topps update
#1

2011 topps update
It is really nice when you look at a set of cards and the lowest priced rookie cards are $1.00.
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#2

RE: 2011 topps update
No doubt! What is the deal with that set anyway? I have the majority of key RC's, but very little else from that set.

Were there low print runs of 2011 Update? Back between 2007 and 2013, was it just harder to find Topps Update in general?
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#3

RE: 2011 topps update
(04-06-2020, 09:49 AM)jbissell Wrote: No doubt! What is the deal with that set anyway? I have the majority of key RC's, but very little else from that set.

Were there low print runs of 2011 Update? Back between 2007 and 2013, was it just harder to find Topps Update in general?
I don't know. I only know that I only bought blasters of that product and was lucky enough to pull one Trout rc. It wasn't until 2019 that I actually bought both a Jumbo and a Hobby of Update

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#4

RE: 2011 topps update
I think the print run on the Update set might be considerably lower than Series 1 and 2. 2011 is obviously the big one in recent years, but the value of most years' rookies are higher than their flagship counterparts.

Whether that's reality or not, I'm not sure, but there's certainly interest in them as though that's the case.
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#5

RE: 2011 topps update
Once again, I am not spewing factual data, but an observation over time.
I believe that Topps, back in the eighties saw the popularity of the annual Update sets. They would sell out and the scarcity would drive up aftermarket prices. They started to produce more and more, until they were stuck with Pallets of unsold cards. They cut way back.
2011 Update was a smaller production series, but with the popularity of the Trout RC by 2014, they were pumping out Update cards at higher numbers to profit off of speculators.
Look at Heritage. The first set (2012), online only was limited to 1000 and sold out very quickly, aftermarket prices are crazy for several cards. The next year they made more, and by 2014 they had printed them in mass quantity. By 2015, they figured they could maximize profits and started selling them in packs only, in retail, and in Hobby. Eventually, they will overproduce to the point where they get stuck with unsold product and will cut back. I am sure the cycle will be repeated again, and again.
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I guess if I saved used tinfoil and used tea bags instead of old comic books and old baseball cards, the difference between a crazed hoarder and a savvy collector is in that inherent value.
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