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Full Version: MICHAEL JORDAN REAL ROOKIE
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correct me if im wrong in the industry the 86 fleerl of jordan sells for crazy amounts of money because everyone considers it his rookie...
now from my understanding a rookie card is the 1 cards of a players first year correct??? in the early 80 the only conpany that was allow by the nba to print cards was the star co. right.......so how come this is not consider his real rookie i mean on top of the fact that the 86 fleer is hard to find but there is many of them out there compare to the star co cards which were limited printed highly conterfeit and vertually impossible to get your hands on one.......i thought wat gave a card value other than the player was availability and quantety
i seen many jordan collections and it seems like people have everysingle year of his cards exept his true rookie cards the star co card...is almost like the indusry doesnt aknowledge the first years of jordan till 86 which i dont understand......so with this in mind can someone explain to me was up wit that
From what I understand, the Star card is his rookie, but they were faked even more than the Fleer. Because of that, nobody wanted the Star card and the Fleer toook over as the Rookie card. The Fleer were also faked of course, but Beckett could determine a real one better than the Star.
The 84-85 Star Co. is considered Jordan's XRC. It was not licensed by the NBA.
Actually the star Co. cards were licensed by the nba, they were just released on a regional distribution - not enmasse like fleer was. For example, if you were in New York and had a car you could easily get team bags (Star Co. cards were sold in bags not packs) for New York, Boston, New Jersey, Philadelphia and Washington within a few hours. Take a weekend and you could get to detroit, chicago, Indianiapolis or atlanta. This is why the Star Cards are considered XRC's - they weren't major distribution.
(02-12-2012, 05:53 PM)taffster74 Wrote: [ -> ]Actually the star Co. cards were licensed by the nba, they were just released on a regional distribution - not enmasse like fleer was. For example, if you were in New York and had a car you could easily get team bags (Star Co. cards were sold in bags not packs) for New York, Boston, New Jersey, Philadelphia and Washington within a few hours. Take a weekend and you could get to detroit, chicago, Indianiapolis or atlanta. This is why the Star Cards are considered XRC's - they weren't major distribution.
That's right. I stand corrected.
OK Star Co. cards are licensed, but it is a combination of things......

First the regional distribution issue was already mentioned.

Then the original printing plates were used to produce more in the 90's. It is almost impossible to tell the diffeence on those originally produced and the later print run. BGS hasn't always graded Star Co. for this reason.

And lastly, the cards were not distributed normally. You saw sets more so than you did random packs. I actually have never seen a pack of Star cards that were not in a clear plastic package and was a completed set of some kind already.

It is what the mainsteam hobby considered the Rookie card, so..........

The 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle is a similiar situation. It is considered his "Holy Grail" of his earliest Topps issued cards. But before Mantle signed exclusive with Topps there was a Rookie Card made by Bowman in 1951. The '52 Topps Mantle sells consitantly higher than the '51 Bowman, but it is not a true RC.
Every time I read about Jordan rookies, I have this sudden desire to be able to timetravel.