`
 (Toll Free)

Beckett Baseball 20 Questions on … prospecting

1Buxton

By Chris Olds | Beckett Baseball Editor

It’s the dead of winter, but we’re less than a month away from the arrival of the first baseball card set of 2014 — and that also means that the first prospect cards (and spring training) aren’t far behind.

With the latest free agency moves not meaning all that much on cardboard, we figured now might be the time to focus an issue of Beckett Baseball on the cards that many collectors simply can’t get enough of — prospects.

As part of that one we want your take on the collecting landscape as part of our latest 20 Questions … this time all about prospects.

1. Who are your top five MLB prospects/newcomers to collect in 2014?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

See the rest of the questions … after the jump.

2SpringerCorrea

2. George Springer or Carlos Correa?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

PaniniUSAauto

3. Do you collect USA Baseball autographs?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

4. Which prospect-focused brands do you buy most? (pick all that apply)

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

5. How much money have you made on prospecting via wax box/case buys?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

6. Have you stockpiled a prospect to sell off later?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

7Money

7. Why do you buy prospect cards?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

8BowmanScout

8. Which answer suits you best?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

9HitterPitcher

9. Hitters or pitchers -- which is better for prospecting successes?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

2013-eee-baseball-abreu

10. Who would you pick?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

11. Which of these players from past Baseball America Top 100 top 10s missed the most?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

12Bush

12. Which of these past No. 1 overall draft picks was the biggest disappointment?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

13. Do you consider yourself a serious prospector?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

14Wilson2010

14. Do you feel collectors can "prospect" in other sports as easily?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

15BuxtonSano

15. Byron Buxton or Miguel Sano?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

16. Should college baseball have a bigger card presence?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

17. Does any prospecting brand top Bowman Draft?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

18handbook

18. Do you own a Baseball America Prospect Handbook (any year)?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

19. How important do you feel prospect cards are for the baseball card industry as a whole?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

20. Would you want to see more or fewer prospecting card brands?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Have more to tell us? Leave a comment below.

Chris Olds is the editor of Beckett Baseball and Beckett Sports Card Monthly magazines. Have a comment, question or idea? Send an email to him at colds@beckett.com. Follow him on Twitter by clicking here.

14 Comments

Daniel Conrad

Prospect collecting is more than just about getting the earliest cards for the next big star. It’s about having cards for the players on the minor league teams I support.

Posted December 30, 2013 at 4:07 pm | Permalink
chrisolds

I purposely didn’t focus on minor league cards here. Though they fall under prospect cards, I reserved the specific questions there for a future 20 Questions.

Posted December 30, 2013 at 4:10 pm | Permalink
Jeorge hibz

As ur avg Joe blow collector (since 72) I buy for the lov of sports , it’s nice to see some value, but I prefer to see a player blossom n2 a superstar or just have a solid 12-15 yr career, looking at the 30 or so different cards of a player puts a smile on my face , somewhere along the line I’ll pick them cards up for 25€ents , I always do, have a wonderful year collecting( or spending if u choose to)

Posted December 30, 2013 at 6:52 pm | Permalink
Jonathan

Nice article Chris. I think people underestimate Springer. Dude’s numbers were better in AAA than in AA. Should be a great year for the Astros!

Posted December 30, 2013 at 7:53 pm | Permalink
brandon

Since i started collecting prospects i have gotten more into the game of baseball. I follow a few different players and teams. Whenever i pull a major card of a upcoming prospect i try to google or check Milb.com for his stats and progress.

Posted December 30, 2013 at 8:25 pm | Permalink
Richard

I kind of prospect a different way.
I like collecting sets that are prospect centric.
So, I personally collect the Leaf Metal Draft and Bowman Platinum sets.
For the Bowman I do the base sets + the prospect autographs since they are hard signed.
The only selling I do is to get rid of duplicate acquired or cards not part of the sets I work on.

Posted December 30, 2013 at 10:32 pm | Permalink
JOEV

When you end up buying a box of rookie and prospect cards you always hope that you end up getting someone really good, but what happens is that everyone in that you get end up being a bust even the autograph finds.

Posted December 30, 2013 at 11:28 pm | Permalink
Simon

I hope Bowman takes note of the response to question #8.

Posted December 31, 2013 at 12:39 am | Permalink
Jeorge hibz

I think the A B P handbook is more for the fantasy basball manager then for collecting, anybody else’s thoughts , ( definition of a true rookie card is not one of minor league prospect , but then u all know that)

Posted December 31, 2013 at 9:53 am | Permalink
David Blyn

When I was a kid, I did some prospecting but it was much cheaper back then. I remember going to shows and being able to pick up 100 count lots of any prospect but that was the late 80’s. I distinctly remember buying up Gary Thurman cards (1988 – rated higher than Gregg Jeffries), Ty Griffin in 1989 (Stupid choice since Ryne Sandberg was in his path), Randy Johnson in 1989 (Great choice but I saw him on the West Palm Beach Expos so I knew he was coming) and a few others. In today’s market, I rather spend money on Vintage cards than prospects that may/may not make it. As a dealer, when customers ask – I recommend staying with USA teamers as they are the best the amateur ranks have to offer and the success rate of those player seems pretty high.

Posted December 31, 2013 at 10:15 am | Permalink

I don’t think prospectors are collectors. They are strictly investors. Collectors collect to keep. Prospectors prospect in hopes of giving up what they’ve accumulated for a profit. That’s not collecting. That’s my opinion. I don’t begrudge them though. It is to my benefit at the local card show to pick up the spoils at blowout prices that the prospectors have left behind.

Posted December 31, 2013 at 11:38 am | Permalink
idiocratic

Lindor will likely be called up in june and will steal 40 bases and hit .300. a.l. rookie of the year. asdrubel cabrera will then be traded by the trade deadline

Posted December 31, 2013 at 4:42 pm | Permalink
Dan

Zeprock, I have to say that I’m evidence that you are not entirely correct. I prospect, because some prospects are my favorite players. I’ve had several interactions with Kris Bryant for example, and I found him to just be the type of guy I can root for. I’ve bought several of his cards, some for more than $100 because I know that if he delivers on what he is cappable of, I know that I won’t be able to touch them later. I have no interest in selling, no matter how much his cards reach. On the flip side, if he is the next Mark Prior, I’ll wish that I would’ve waited to buy (20/20 hindsight), but it’s not a total loss because I still enjoy owning the card.
I’m frustrated by the prospect investors who are just looking to cash in. I’d love to buy all of Bryant’s cards, but when his cards come out of the pack already in the hundreds of dollars, how can I? Or even more so, how can your average baseball savy kid?

Posted January 2, 2014 at 6:17 pm | Permalink

Dan, I would call you a collector because you are trying to collect all of his cards. You can collect prospects and still be a collector. You’re looking to acquire cards for your collection, you’re not looking to sell them off for profit.

Posted January 3, 2014 at 3:16 pm | Permalink

Post a Comment

Your email is never shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*