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Jeremy Lin, Houston Rocket … now what?

By Chris Olds | Beckett Basketball Editor | Commentary

One of this past season’s biggest stories was the tale of Jeremy Lin, who came out of nowhere to become the biggest thing in The Big Apple as a star for the New York Knicks for a couple months and then faded just as quickly due to injury.

The point guard’s meteoric rise was one that’s perhaps unparalleled — at least in a few years — and sparked a run on cardboard not seen on the hardwood in some time for a player not named LeBron. His 85 total cards, not including those too rare to price, still command a total of $13,994 to own. (Need an OPG or checklist? Click here.)

Now, he’ll return to the Houston Rockets — a team he briefly played for — after signing a $25.1 million three-year deal, according to ESPN.

We want to know … what do you think this will do for his cardboard?

Jeremy Lin's cardboard future

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Chris Olds is the editor of Beckett Basketball magazine. Have a comment, question or idea? Send an email to him at colds@beckett.com. Follow him on Twitter by clicking here.

10 Comments

Josiah Cecil

Sorry folks I do not see the big deal with this guy. He is mediocre at best and was by chance in the limelight for a month. Seriously the guy cant use but one hand and is a very limited player. The only reason why this became such a huge story is why…. oh ya he played in New York City, the biggest melting pot of media in the U.S. So basically us “sports followers” have heard enough about the one month fluke. Next story!

Posted July 17, 2012 at 10:13 pm | Permalink
Phil

really? a fluke? what other fluke had 5 games like that?

stop drinking the hatorade and drink some bubble tea my friend.

watch next year as J-lin puts up 18-9 a game

Posted July 18, 2012 at 12:17 am | Permalink

his cards were up for a few weeks – to disproportionate heights – and then went down again. This will seal it.

Posted July 18, 2012 at 4:07 am | Permalink
Josiah Cecil

Phil exactly what you said my friend “5 GAMES” not a season not 2 seasons but 5 games, next please!

Posted July 18, 2012 at 11:14 am | Permalink
deeez

houston is not new york in terms of market value
if lin went to lakers there would be a spike
if he went to bobcats it would drop
hosuton equals sell sell sell

Posted July 18, 2012 at 11:42 am | Permalink
Kingbudd

Jeremy Lin only started 25 games, and only played 35 total games before being injured. People question if Derrick Rose can come back from his injury, yet, people never say the same thing about Lin. Derrick Rose is a future HOFer, Jeremy Lin is NOT. As for card value, the market in Houston is not the same as New York. To believe that Lin’s cards will hold value in Houston is a stretch. The truly question is will the Asian community support the move? They are the ones buying his cards, not Americans. Yao Ming still has a stable market within China and other Asian countries, so depending on China and other markets outside of the US will determine how successful Jeremy Lin’s cards maintain value.

Posted July 18, 2012 at 1:06 pm | Permalink
Richard

Yao Ming CAME from China, Lin is an American born and bred.

Lin is an above average player. Hard to call a guy who scores 38 points against Kobe mediocre.
While his cardboard might do better, for a while, in New York, his chances at getting playing time
there are shrinking. He will get more play time in Houston and thus the opportunity to shine.
One would think that if Durant can sell well playing in Oklahoma then Jeremy could do so in Houston, if
he proves himself.

I will say that, for now, his cards are over priced. They reflect his potential, but not his long term playing.
He does have a significant fan base that will follow him and likely Houston will get most of their contract
money back simply by selling Jerseys and filling seats that might otherwise not have sold.

Posted July 18, 2012 at 2:04 pm | Permalink
Kingbudd

@Richard

You do realize that the majority of collectors collecting Lin are from overseas, right? Proven fact. Asian countries; especially, China love when Asians make it in the NBA. Look at Yi Jianlian, he is a total scrub, but his cards still hold value because overseas countries like China collect him. Where someone is born doesn’t have everything to do with it, unfortunately, the color of his skin does. For Asian collectors, anyone that is Asian is highly collectible.

Posted July 18, 2012 at 2:44 pm | Permalink
David Johnson

His cards will drop in value for the immediate future, however if he turns into a superstar in Houston than expect the value to come back.

Posted July 18, 2012 at 3:56 pm | Permalink
Richard

@Kingbudd

While I do believe that he has a lot of overseas fans, it was not the over seas fans that made many of
his cards sell for over $1000, it was the Knicks fans. Consider that Yao Ming is a national hero, a likely
HOF’er yet his best cards sell for LESS than Lin’s cards.

Part of Lin’s popularity is that he is an AMERICAN Asian and thus a role model for the local Asian kids
that their dream may come true. He is a Harvard graduate, getting a degree in a real discipline (economics).
His fans chant GPA instead of MVP.

As for Yi Jianlian, I don’t know what the price guides say, but his Exquisite RC just sold on Ebay for less than
$40, so I’m not impressed by your argument.

Now if we ever get an import from Japan that can play ball, then things will go truly insane.
The Japanese collectors are among the most fanatical collectors of American Basketball Cards.

A few years back I met one from Japan at the National in Anaheim who had purchased a dealer table just
to display his collection and show what he was buying. He had a case full of the Fleer Metal Green parallels
and wanted to purchase every one that came his way. Now add up the costs involved in flying here, getting
a DEALER table, not to mention the actual purchases made and arranged and you understand what I
mean by fanatical.

Posted July 18, 2012 at 5:12 pm | Permalink

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